Amazon.com’s Top 100 Books of 2010

Amazon announced today its Top 100 Books for 2010, in time, naturally enough, for the Christmas shopping season. Actually, there are two top 100 lists: one from the Amazon editors and one based on customer sales. Only books which were published for the first time in 2010 are included. I have no numbers at this time as to how many are available for Kindle*, but I figured these lists could be a good starting point for my readers (and myself) to look for something new to read, add to holiday wish lists, or purchase as gifts for others.

Here are the top 5 editorial picks for your quick reference:

  1. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
    by Rebecca Skloot: From a single, short life grew a seemingly immortal line of cells that made some of the most crucial innovations in modern science possible. From that same life, Skloot fashions a rich and haunting story that redefines what it means to have a medical history.
  2. Faithful Place by Tana French: The past haunts in French novels. In this compelling and cutting mystery, Frank Mackey (the beloved undercover guru from “The Likeness”) returns home to investigate the cold case of his teenage sweetheart, and faces down his family.
  3. Matterhorn: A Novel of the Vietnam War by Karl Marlantes: A breathtaking debut (30 years in the making) by a decorated Vietnam veteran that takes readers deep into the jungle, and offers a new perspective on the ravages of war, the bureaucracy of the military, and the peculiar beauty of brotherhood.
  4. Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand: As she did with “Seabiscuit,” Hillenbrand has unearthed another unlikely and inspiring tale from our past. Louis Zamperini was an Olympic athlete as a teenager, an airman in World War II, an ocean crash survivor, and a prisoner of war before returning home for another half-century of life.
  5. The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson: Through the eyes of three families, Wilkerson gives vivid life to one of the great untold epics of American history: the migration between the two world wars of millions of African Americans from the South to the North and West.

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* Thanks to GMUHistorian’s comment below, I am now aware of the Kindle Editors’ Top 100 Picks page.